5 Tips For Working With A Professional Photographer

August 9, 2019

It can be hard getting those outfit shots for Instagram, you haven’t always got anyone on hand to get those full body shots, and even if you do, it can still be hard to get the shot. So, hiring a professional photographer specialising in fashion photography to get your shots can help you to no end. They understand what you’re looking for and how to get it. 

It can be a bit daunting, so I’ve put together some tips to make your first shoot experience a bit less awkward than my first photoshoot was. Seriously, that’s why I stay behind the camera.

Location

Think about your location. Make sure it’s versatile. It’s all well and good finding a really nice door on instagram that you want to shoot in-front of, but do you really want a full hour of photos of just that door, because everything else nearby looks like a bomb site? To get the most out of your shoot as possible, give yourself as many ideas and opportunities as possible.

Each location doesn’t need to be huge either, just enough to fill the camera frame, so even if you’ve got three really nice doors all next to each other, that works. (Yes, I’m taking the door analogy and running with it). You don’t have to have a different famous landmark for each outfit, so get creative. The amount of times I’ve seen a hedge or a bit of overgrown grass and thought “yep, that’ll do me”, it just takes a bit of imagination.

Outfits

model looking at and touching a plant

What would a fashion photoshoot be without its star of the show? (Other than all your beautiful mugs) So, make sure they’re well planned, thought out and co-ordinated. The amount of clients that have messaged me asking what they should wear to their own shoots baffles me, you’ve got complete creative direction over your shoot, so make the most of it! Colour theory will play a huge part in how your images look, so try to consider your location when planning your outfits, and how they can co-ordinate.

Depending on your location, getting changed could be a ~slight~ issue. With some locations, you can get quite lucky, if it’s in a busy area, chances are there will be some toilets around for you to quickly dash in and change (oh, that glamorous life of a fashion model), but sometimes you might end up having to quickly and [as] discreetly [as possible] change in the street. 

If this is you (and it’s been me too) I’d recommend ordering your outfits in a way that means you can add more clothes on and maybe take other clothes off underneath (the shorts under skirt trick from school still comes in handy) or wear some gym shorts and a small top underneath to stop you from having to get it ALL out.

Props

model swinging a red handbag

Posing can always be awkward, no matter how many times you’ve gotten in-front of the lens. If you’re a bit of a newbie or don’t know what to do with your hands (it’s a genuine problem), I’d recommend finding a prop or accessory to hold.

This can be sunglasses, a hat, a handbag, just about anything really. I’ve also known some people to use food as a prop. Both useful and delicious.

You can also interact with your surroundings. Seen some flowers hanging? Go and get involved with them, hold them like the Disney princess you are. 

Bigger props can also make good distractions. Not feeling massively confident in a certain area of your body? You can easily hold a bag or hat in-front, while looking candid and chic at the same time. A bold colour to match your accessories can also make your outfit really POP and bring the whole concept together and give you a high fashion vibe.

Movement

model laughing

While we’re on the subject of looking candid, one of the best ways to get natural-looking, relaxed shots is to keep moving.

You don’t have to be constantly dancing around in dramatic poses, small subtle changes in your position are enough to get a great photo. And if you need a bit of help, your photographer should be able to direct you into a good starting point. 

It’s a common thing during a photoshoot to “warm up” and get more into it as the shoot goes on, which can sometimes make your first few shots a bit uncomfortable looking if you’re not used to being in-front of the camera. 

My ultimate way to fight against this is to start by sitting down. This way, while you’re getting used to this strange person shoving a camera in your face, you only really have to think about the position of your arms, eliminating half the problem while you ease into it.

Credit

And now for the boring part. As with any art, so much of our business is gained through word of mouth. That’s why it’s important to make sure that people are aware of who took your photos, otherwise we may not be able to keep doing it. It’s as simple as putting it at the end of your caption or tweet, or if you really don’t want to do that, tagging us in the photo. 

It’s such a small thing but it really keeps us being able to do what we love and create for you.

And there you have it, my top tips for making the most of your photoshoot, whether it’s your first time or you’re an experience OOTD-er. All photos shown are my own, so if you like the look of them and want some of your own, drop me a message through contact page, Instagram or Twitter.

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